Tea and Two-Legged Architecture.

When you see something that causes you to pause, you know its done something to you. Something has changed. Such is the case with when I discovered Terunobu Fujimori. It was last May and I was thumbing through an issue of Dwell when I was caught off guard by this image of his two-legged tea house.

The Too-High Tea House

The Too-High Tea House with rolled copper roof.

At first thought, I was sure this was a children’s tree house. Nope, much cooler! Terunobu Fujimori is an architetural historian who has a streak for letting loose his eccentric curiosity of life in his designs, such as the two-legged tea house and a dandilion and grass covered roof.

The Charred Cedar House is treated with an ancient Japanese technique that seals the wood against rain and rot.

Fujimori's own residence built in 1995.

Rock siding and grass and dandelions on the roof and walls.

Rock siding and grass and dandelions on the roof and walls.

But what captures my senses most of all is the charred walls of a few of his structures. You see, in Japanese culture, the charring of wood is said to protect the structure from insects, moisure damage and other diseases for up to 80 years!

The Charred Cedar House.

The Charred Cedar House.

Charring process with fire moving evenly up the three planks.

Charring process with fire moving evenly up the three planks.

The charred pieces.

The charred pieces.

Plus, the burnt look adds a way cool charcoal texture that makes the abode even more interesting. He’s surely charred his way into my top list of architects.

The Coal House tea room suspends from second floor, only accessible by ladder.

The Coal House tea room suspends from second floor, only accessible by ladder.

The Coal House outdoor tea room ladder contrasts with the charred siding.

The Coal House outdoor tea room ladder contrasts with the charred siding.

The tea rooms low ceiling created an adult playroom, intimate and ready for tea time.

The tea rooms low ceiling created an adult playroom, intimate and ready for tea time.

Architecture and nature combine in many of Fujimori’s projects. From trees, grasses, and plants, Fujimori built amusing structures that deserve a second glance.

The Hot Spring House has two pines sticking out of the top - nature and architecture.

The Hot Spring House has two pines sticking out of the top - nature and architecture.

The Camellia Castle has a grass covered roof and a cladding of grass and stone.

The Camellia Castle has a soft grass-covered roof and a cladding of grass and stone.

This humpback children's museum has a playful tone.

This humpback children's museum has a playful tone.

Those of you near the Outback can see an art installation by Teruobu Fujimori at the RMIT Gallery.

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